What is the difference between stator and armature?

What is the difference between an armature and a commutator?

An armature is a combination of the winding, commutator, brushes, and ball bearings.

What is Commutator?

Armature Commutator
It receives current from the armature windings It receives current from the armature core
The core consists of armature windings, commutator, and brushes It has some segments

What is difference between armature and rotor?

It is located inside the stator and its objective is to rotate so that in turn the motor shaft or generator rotates. So basically, the rotor consists of a field magnet which rotates while the rotor remains stationary and on the other hand the armature carries current and is stationary and part of the stator.

Is armature winding stator?

The armature is the winding to which the load is connected. In small generators, the field windings are often on the stator, and the armature windings are on the rotor. Most large machines, however, have a rotating field and a stationary armature. … Thus, the armature is the stator and the field is the rotor.

What are the advantages of using armature as the stator in a power generator?

It is because they are not subjected to centrifugal forces and also extra space is available due to the stationary arrangement of the armature. The stationary 3-phase armature can be directly connected to load without going through large, unreliable slip rings and brushes.

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What is called armature?

1 : an organ or structure (such as teeth or thorns) for offense or defense. 2a : a piece of soft iron or steel that connects the poles of a magnet or of adjacent magnets.

What is difference between armature and field winding?

Armature Winding is the winding, in which voltage is induced. Field Winding is the winding in which the main field flux is produced when the current through the winding is passed.

What is the function of a stator?

The stator is the coil of wire housed inside the engine case. A magnet on a shaft spins within the stator, creating alternating current (AC). That current travels along fairly heavy gauge wire through the case and into the rectifier/regulator which converts it to DC power, and at a consistent output.